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Monthly Archives: July 2018

Colored Diamond

Diamond possesses many qualities, which make it an ideal gemstone. It is extremely hard, and also very tough and hard wearing, and this also helps it to take a very high polish. Some hard articles are brittle which detracts from their durability. There are some things, which are harder than diamond. In its pure form it is colorless, has a high refractive index, so has a very high luster. It possesses high dispersion, meaning that different light wavelengths are diffracted differently, giving a strong scintillating play of prismatic colors.

Pure diamond, if such a thing exists, is colorless. Most diamonds are slightly colored, even if the coloring is almost imperceptible. The commonest color is yellow, which is caused by tiny amounts of nitrogen being present in the crystal structure; others are gray, light brown or greenish. Diamond can be almost any color, although strongly colored attractive specimens are very rare, and as such are not actively promoted. Probably in case consumers realize that blue, red, green and other colors are attractive, and start buying sapphires, rubies, emeralds and other gemstones instead of diamonds!
As with many gemstones, colors can be artificially produced or modified.

Colored diamonds in trade go under the name “fancy color”. Because of their rarity they are held in very esteem, especially when the color displays an intense saturation. The most valuable diamond, however are the completely colorless stones- in this respect diamond is the only gemstone whose colorlessness renders it more valuable.

Montana Sapphires

Montana sapphires are truly some of the finest quality sapphires in the world. They come in a variety of colors. They are COMPLETELY NATURAL gemstones.

Sapphire was first discovered in Montana in the late 1800’s by gold miners working the gravels of Missouri River near Helena. The gold prospectors discovered the Gem Mountain sapphire deposit in 1892. Since that time, this mine has produced 180 million carats of sapphire.

When modern heat treatment processes were introduced, Montana sapphire production went through the roof.

Unfortunately, the sapphires from this location (Gem Mountain) are usually quite small. However, the color and clarity of these gems make up for it. They come in red, orange, yellow, green, pink and blue. They also come in a combination of these colors and because of their color changes under evening lighting they are extremely unique.

Most of the gem grade sapphire in the market place is heat-treated. When Montana sapphire is properly heat treated, they explode with color. Diamond cutting brings out a brilliance under various lighting conditions that is unique to these gemstones. It is very difficult to find Montana sapphires that are gem quality without being heat-treated.

Japanese Jewelry

Japanese crafts were always full of ideas and meanings, a careful approach must be taken when selecting Japan jewellery. If you choose the right pair of earrings – you might get happy, longevity might be on the way, and fate may be hiding in lucky earrings.

Many jewelry items are named and created by the image of something very important to culture. It is very unusual for Japanese jewellery to be abstract. For example, take a dragon earrings. Dragon symbolizes strength, fortune and prosperity; Japanese Happiness Earrings, which are shaped after Japanese glyph of “happiness”.

Japanese jewelry is very fine in detail, which is something you can expect from a nation that creates computers. Every detail is well-thought and full of meaning, so you shouldn’t worry wearing any of those Japanese rings, bracelets or chains.

To see something really astonishing you should try searching Google Images for “japanese tiara” – now that’s where sophisticated high-tech meets art! It’s amazing!

Can you imaging 600 silver pieces in chain with diamonds that form a bracelet! Can you imagine 600 chains on your hand? That’s what Japanese jewellery is all about.

Jewellers try to fit into individualist world, where everybody must have a very sophisticated unique jewelry. Japan jewelry is very distinctive and attention-grabbing.

It’s weird but it’s much easier to find something Japanese silver, than anything in gold.

A deep search exposed us astonishing pearl-decorated golden ring and pearl earrings. I would have never thought that pearl could match gold so perfectly! To see that, I did a search for “Japanese diamond ring” in Google Images. It’s funny that Japanese pearl decoration can be found via diamond link. And if you’ll surf through – you can find some really spectacular Japanese rings and neckwear. Everything is made with a great sense of detail, like I told you.

Really interesting things can be found by a Cornelis Hollander, nine-time winner of the “International Pearl Design” contest in Japan (and a couple of other big name titles), he is really innovative. His golden rings possess style and uniqueness, bringing a fresh breath of air into jewelry. Being a Netherlands-born and winning nine-time title in Pearl Design Contest in Japan, he must have really stimulated Japanese crafters to seek new ways to design pearl rings. If you followed me search above – you’ll probably agree with me: this influenced Japanese Jewelry in a very positive ways.

Cubic Zirconia

Zirconium in its pure form is actually a chemical element that can be found in the periodic table. For those interested it has an Atomic Number of 40. However, although a naturally occurring element and metal, it is not found in its pure form and instead forms a part of several minerals, the most common being Zirconium Silicate which is mined heavily in the USA, Australia, India, Brazil and Russia.

Zirconium was discovered in 1789 by the German chemist Martin Klaproth, although he did not manage to isolate the element. This was achieved in 1824 by Jons Jakob Berzelius, a Swedish chemist, with pure Zirconium first prepared in 1914. Pure Zirconium is a greyish-white metal that is used in a wide range of industrial processes including heavy use by the Nuclear industry due to its hardness, heat resistance and non-reactive properties. These characteristics also help to make it ideal for jewellery.

Obviously a grey-white metal would hardly make an ideal substitute diamond so the raw material needs processing to produce the clarity required for jewellery. To do this high purity zirconium oxide powders, stabilized with magnesium and calcium, are heated to very high temperatures until they melt together, crystalising and clarifying on cooling to produce a clear, hard substance with properties similar to diamond and suitable for use in jewellery. During this process small amounts of other chemicals can also be added to produce different coloured crystals.

Although ‘close’ to real diamond, there are obviously small different between Cubic Zirconia and diamond including hardness and brilliance. The naked eye finds it hard to differentiate between the two, however true diamond does have an increased refractive index (the ability to refract a ray of light into its component colours). Cubic Zirconia (CZ) has a refractive index of around 2.16, whereas diamond has an index value of 2.42. As I say, although this is difficult to pickup with the naked eye it does mean that true diamond will always ‘sparkle’ just that little bit more when properly cut.